#TBT: How I Became An Epic Fail in 2017

 my 2017 was a lot like this camel ride 🐫: they both were terrifying, exhilarating, far from smooth, and make for good content! ⚡️  (for a hilarious video of me almost falling off the camel after the one behind me knocked my hat off my head, check out my IG @roadtorima - epic failure at its finest) 

my 2017 was a lot like this camel ride 🐫: they both were terrifying, exhilarating, far from smooth, and make for good content! ⚡️

(for a hilarious video of me almost falling off the camel after the one behind me knocked my hat off my head, check out my IG @roadtorima - epic failure at its finest) 

YES, I MEANT WHAT I SAID.

EVERY YEAR IS FILLED WITH FAILURE,

BUT 2017 WAS MY MOST EPIC YEAR YET. 

Before you get too confused, let's take a moment to define the word EPIC. 

EPIC (ADJ.):

HEROIC OR GRAND IN SCALE OR CHARACTER;

PARTICULARLY IMPRESSIVE OR REMARKABLE

They spelled rimarkable wrong, but that's besides the point.😜 

Let's run it back: I AM NOW AN EPIC FAIL. Why?

Well, because we are all failures. It might be one of the few traits that we all share. We all fail, every single day, at something. At many things. Things rarely go as planned. Most things are not in our control, but our mindset certainly is.

So why wouldn't we choose to fail remarkably, heroically, impressively, EPICLY? I learned how to fail epicly last year simply because I chose to fail forward: to view each roadblock as a minor setback for a major comeback. I have failed many times along my #roadtorima, and i still managed to make those failures work in my favor.

HERE IS HOW I BECAME AN EPIC FAIL IN 2017:


1. I Set Exceedingly Ambitous goals

Some might call these expectations unrealistic, but I chose not to use that word for a reason (more on that with #3). I have very ambitious goals. I am also a very realistic person. But, like I said, not all things go as planned, and most things are not in my control. I became an epic fail first by setting expectations that were very difficult to attain. The chances of failure were inherently higher than the chances for success with this approach. So what? i took my ego out of the equation and replaced it with my purpose. i am here to do amazing things, so all of my goals need to be ambitious ones. i may have landed in the stars, but I'm an epic failure because i'm still reaching for the moon. i have no doubt that i'll get there either.

2. I CELEBRATEd PROGRESs, not perfection

Perfection isn't a thing, so I don't waste my energy thinking about it. Instead, I clap for baby steps. As I work towards an ambitious goal, I am continuously celebrating my progress. there are so many times when i didn't reach my goal in my desired timeline, but guess what? i got there eventually. had i given up because of my lack of perfection instead of celebrating my progress, i would have never achieved that goal. This mindset is the whole premise behind the #roadto_ brand. I realized that the journey is often more rewarding than arriving at the destination. This level of positivity enables me to achieve so much that I end up being proud of myself regardless what the outcome ends up being. My failures are always epic because my recognition of my progress ensures that I never give up on myself. 

3. I spoke positively on My process

This is exactly why I chose the word "exceedingly" instead of "unrealistic," why I chose "epic" to accompany the word "failure." I monitor my thoughts all the time. you would really be surprised how much negativity is in our subconscious if we don't actively filter it. Our subconscious mind has so much power over our mindset and thus, over our trajectory. The law of attraction is real, so it is extremely important to ensure your thoughts and self-talk are strictly positive. This becomes especially important when it comes to how we internalize our failures. give yourself credit and grace, be patient with your process, and don't take failure personally. The most resilient people are able to "dust it all off and try again" because they monitor their thoughts and ensure that they process their failure in a positive, epic way. 

4. I dusted it all off before i tried again

it sounds so cliche, but it's real. on this #roadtorima, i've fallen several times. but guess who got back up and dusted it all off, right away? getting up is not enough. you need to dust it all off if you want to keep going. let it go. i would not have been able to keep moving had I not decided to dust it all off after getting up. there is no way you can walk in your purpose if you don't leave behind the emotional baggage that you are not meant to carry. this involves a lot of #3, a lot of self-forgiveness, and a lot of willingness to approach that same situation sometimes in a completely different way. you can most definitely learn from past mistakes, and you should, but when i say i dusted it all off, i'm strictly talking about any emotions or stress that my previous failure left me with. 

5. I ri-routed and ri-evaluated when necessary

are you the kind of person who sets a goal and sticks to it even after you realize you don't even care about it anymore? that's an ego issue. and ego and purpose don't really get along. i'm not judging you - i used to be that person, until i learned how to be an epic failure. sometimes failure is a sign that you are not walking in alignment with what you were sent here to do. sometimes it is a red-flag that you should re-evaluate that goal and your reasons for setting it. there were many times this past year when i set a goal, failed, realized that it wasn't in alignment with my #roadtorima (or commitment to being the best version of myself). I thanked god for that closed door and simply re-routed in a direction that made sense for me. 


i used to think that having high expectations for myself alone meant that i was acting from a place of self-love. i used to think that being my biggest critic also made me my #1 fan. and while neither of the two pairs are mutually exclusive, it is indeed very possible to have one without the other: that is, high expectations with no love, criticism without celebration.

we tend to be so hard on ourselves, especially post-failure. you, too, could argue that this means you have high expectations for yourself, but why wouldn't you just channel those expectations on the front end to root for yourself? that way, if you have to fail, you'll do so epicly. and is it really failure when you commit to being heroic, remarkable and impressive?

I THINK NOT. 

only love,

ri

 

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